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Upon the return to Vienna in May 1908, Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) and Alma Mahler (1879-1964) settled on a new summer residence. They rented quarters in Haus Trenker, a large farmhouse in Altschluderbach near Toblach.

Working in his new 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof (Composing cottage) during the last three summers of his life, Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) composed Das Lied von der Erde, Symphony No. 9 and fragments of Symphony No. 10.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

02-10-1957. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

2014. 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof. Memorial plaque.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

Year 19091908-1910 Hotel TrenkerhofGustav Mahler (1860-1911) and Anna Justine Mahler (Gucki) (1904-1988). Back side 1909.

Year 19091908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof. Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). Back side 1909.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof. Back side 2014.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

Year 1909. Letters from Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) to Frau Alma Mahler (1879-1964) in 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof (Villa Trenker, Toblach, Tirol) and in 1909-1911 House Carl Moll II Vienna - Wollergasse No. 10 (Hohe Warte district, Vienna).

Walter Gropius

During the summer (while Alma was taking a prescribed rest at the spa at Tobelbad) she met and fell in love with the young architect Walter Gropius (1883-1969). Not intending to disclose the affair, she joined Mahler at 1908-1910 Hotel Trenkerhof.

Opening a letter one day, Mahler found himself reading a letter that Gropius had written to Alma and inadvertently addressed to Gustav Mahler. In the intense ensuing talks between husband and wife, Alma aired her dissatisfactions concerning their marriage, and Gustav, more than anything else fearful of losing Alma, was thrown into emotional turmoil.

A love-struck Gropius appeared at Altschluderbach at one point, apparently hoping to resolve the situation. Alma seems to have indicated to Mahler that she did not intend to leave him.

Sigmund Freud

Nevertheless, he was so shaken that he arranged on the spur of the moment to consult with Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) in Leiden, in the Netherlands. (less than a week before the final rehearsals in Munich were due to begin). He and Freud talked one afternoon, to beneficial effect, and Mahler returned to Altschluderbach. See Meeting with Freud in Leiden.

Symphony No. 8

It was during this emotionally overwrought time at Altschluderbach that Mahler took out Alma’s songs, began to play them, and had such a great change of heart about her composing. He also asked her if she would like him to dedicate Symphony No. 8 to her (which he subsequently did).

That summer, besides preparing for the premiere of Symphony No. 8, Mahler was also working on the sketches for his Symphony No. 10. Tortured exclamations scribbled in the margins of the manuscript are testimony to his distraught state of mind - among these, impassioned declarations of love for Alma. To the dismay of many, Alma reprinted these marginal notes in her memoir Gustav Mahler. Erinnerungen und Briefe, published in 1940.